Metta World Peace a Voice of Reason Amid NBA Lockout

Yes, David Stern, this is how out of balance things have become no thanks to your greedy owners. Suddenly the man that has the most sensible take on the NBA lockout is none other than Metta World Peace aka Ron Artest.

How this has happened is about as good a snapshot as you’ll get on the ludicrous lockout that threatens the NBA season.

Mark Medina of the L.A. Times quotes World Peace who stopped to talk during a promo for Sungevity at Hollywood & Highland yesterday.

“Instead of trying to become basketball players and a rapper, get a degree or become an owner.”

“It’s their business. It’s not our business. As you can see, Mr. Stern can change rules whenever he wants. He does that a lot and sometimes it’s better for the game. But it’s educational for me.”

Leave it to Metta to put this entire process in perspective. He is absolutely correct in urging more players to pursue a career in the business of basketball so situations such as this can be resolved in a more constructive fashion. Both sides seem to be speaking a completely different language.

To be fair, the NBA does have one owner that was once a player but we’ve all come to learn His Unfairness has fully morphed into a businessman having long ago traded his shorts for suits.

However that does not discredit Metta’s advice for future players. Going forward it will be for the benefit of the game – not just the NBA – if more players are using those free educations they receive to better understand the nature of these dealings.

Speaking of education, World Peace also views the lockout as a learning experience. Yet another fresh take on this tumultuous situation.

Metta is also dead on the money when he states just who owns the NBA. The players are but pawns in this game. They come and go every year whereas the owners are the ones that can remain on board for life if they so choose.

Something that should be noted is that Metta made it clear that the money has never been his motivation. This fact cannot be ignored as it aids in his stance on the current offer.

“When I came to the Lakers, it wasn’t about money for me. It wasn’t about money. I didn’t even negotiate. I asked, ‘What do you want to give me?’ and I signed it. Other players have concerns, but I don’t really base my life around money.”

Now I’m not saying if everyone involved in these negotiations had Metta’s view on things that this would be over. Money might not move him but it certainly does make the world go round. Still, there has always been a certain genius to the man formerly known as Artest. Some of that sage wisdom from Phil Jackson has clearly taken to World Peace. Now if only he could help spread some of that to the rest of the parties involved so we can get ourselves some NBA hoops…soon.

Topics: David Stern, Metta World Peace, NBA Lockout, Phil Jackson

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  • shanesfm

    The fact that ur posting a blog about Mettas insight on mba lockout discredits you automatically lol

  • shanesfm

    The fact that ur posting a blog about Mettas insight on mba lockout discredits you automatically lol

  • neokoros

    Makes more sense then players who want to strike for one year, make 20-40% overseas what they would make currently at home, then come back home in 1-2 years after the lockout to a CBA that is worst than the current offer.

  • neokoros

    Makes more sense then players who want to strike for one year, make 20-40% overseas what they would make currently at home, then come back home in 1-2 years after the lockout to a CBA that is worst than the current offer.

  • neokoros

    Note: I know it’s technically a lock-out, not a strike, but its a fine line of difference, and after the owners made the offer, if it is rejected by players, I think it is more of a strike than a lockout. Example is if your employer cuts salaries 10% across the board because of company financial losses and you quit instead of taking a pay cut, you can’t collect unemployment because you quit and you weren’t fired.

  • neokoros

    @shanesfm

    Note: I know it’s technically a lock-out, not a strike, but its a fine line of difference, and after the owners made the offer, if it is rejected by players, I think it is more of a strike than a lockout. Example is if your employer cuts salaries 10% across the board because of company financial losses and you quit instead of taking a pay cut, you can’t collect unemployment because you quit and you weren’t fired.

  • neokoros

    Note: I know it’s technically a lock-out, not a strike, but its a fine line of difference, and after the owners made the offer, if it is rejected by players, I think it is more of a strike than a lockout. Example is if your employer cuts salaries 10% across the board because of company financial losses and you quit instead of taking a pay cut, you can’t collect unemployment because you quit and you weren’t fired.

  • neokoros

    @shanesfm

    Note: I know it’s technically a lock-out, not a strike, but its a fine line of difference, and after the owners made the offer, if it is rejected by players, I think it is more of a strike than a lockout. Example is if your employer cuts salaries 10% across the board because of company financial losses and you quit instead of taking a pay cut, you can’t collect unemployment because you quit and you weren’t fired.

  • shanesfm

    @neokoros I think your just thinking of yourself. Fans need to stop being so 1 sided. If this was you then it would be the same story. It’s about being taken advantage of at the table that they create. Lets get something clear…players are not EMPLOYEES…they are the PRODUCT! If you don’t understand where I’m going with this then please go back to college and take a course in Business Development and take a side job into the entertainment world. This isn’t some guys pulling a 9-5. You, Me and a most of the fans out here work for normal companies where the owners have full rights to do whatever they wish as long as it doesn’t inflict and civil or harmful liability. However, in this situation, it is NOT the case.

  • shanesfm

    @neokoros Again, the players are not employees, they are the product which is why they have rights to negotiate each contract concerning BRI in the first place. You clearly lack the knowledge to gather what is going on in these negotiations. This is concerning negotiations between the product and the owners for BRI etc etc. I’m sorry, but if the owners lost the Lebrons and Kobe’s to Europe leagues they would get hit dramatically. Unfortunately, the players have never been united and the owners know this. I honestly don’t know which would be better. For the players to hold firm and show the owners they hold as much strength as they do (which the do if they united) or just accept the deal they seem to already have secretly agreed on and skip the drama. Which I believe is what the fans are sick of….the drama. Sadly, this is being constructed by only a few owners..primarily Dan Gilbert from the Cavaliers. He took a dramatic hit when Lebron left and has more to lose than anybody if the deal is in favor of the players.

  • shanesfm

    @neokoros I think your just thinking of yourself. Fans need to stop being so 1 sided. If this was you then it would be the same story. It’s about being taken advantage of at the table that they create. Lets get something clear…players are not EMPLOYEES…they are the PRODUCT! If you don’t understand where I’m going with this then please go back to college and take a course in Business Development and take a side job into the entertainment world. This isn’t some guys pulling a 9-5. You, Me and a most of the fans out here work for normal companies where the owners have full rights to do whatever they wish as long as it doesn’t inflict and civil or harmful liability. However, in this situation, it is NOT the case.

  • shanesfm

    @neokoros Again, the players are not employees, they are the product which is why they have rights to negotiate each contract concerning BRI in the first place. You clearly lack the knowledge to gather what is going on in these negotiations. This is concerning negotiations between the product and the owners for BRI etc etc. I’m sorry, but if the owners lost the Lebrons and Kobe’s to Europe leagues they would get hit dramatically. Unfortunately, the players have never been united and the owners know this. I honestly don’t know which would be better. For the players to hold firm and show the owners they hold as much strength as they do (which the do if they united) or just accept the deal they seem to already have secretly agreed on and skip the drama. Which I believe is what the fans are sick of….the drama. Sadly, this is being constructed by only a few owners..primarily Dan Gilbert from the Cavaliers. He took a dramatic hit when Lebron left and has more to lose than anybody if the deal is in favor of the players.

  • neokoros

    @shanesfm I hear all the time that if players like Lebron and Kobe left, it would have an impact on the league, thus the players are what put butts in the seats and they deserve all they ask for the negotiations, but the thing is that 10% of the players are the ones that draw the crowds and most of the players could be interchangeable without too much reaction and without loss of revenue. To compare it to a singer is a bad analogy, and using personal attacks shows your immaturity. Yes, Kobe and Lebron can have contracts like a singer in the entertainment business, but this bri split is for all players and players like Wayne Ellington, Lazar Hayward, Malcolm Lee, Darko Milicic, Novi Sad, Brad Miller, Nikola Pekovic, Luke Ridnour, Sebastian Telfair, Anthony Tollive, and Martell Webster, are more like the little known opening act to a concert – they are not the draw themselves. That is the problem with the contract, not that the Kobe’s Lebron’s, Durants, and Rose’s are paid too much, but other players are. If you took business school classes like I have, you would know that you can’t apply facts from 10% of the group to the whole and you need to see things from a overall perspective. Also if you want to compare this to actors, the headliner actors get the millions while the minor characters and one-liners get very, very little in comparison. A movie studio would never agree to give a certain % of profits to the actor in the movie who has one minute of dialogue. Those people are interchangeable and you can’t say that actor got people to the theaters and HE is the product, the main revenue draw is the headliner actors and the way that the whole film was put together.

  • neokoros

    @shanesfm Please see reply further below. Also, personal attacks make me doubt you ever went to college and are not necessary. Players are employees AND the product,*

    that is very simple and obvious.

    But overall, I don’t understand what any of this has to do with my initial comment saying that if players cancel the year, it hurts them more financially then taking the deal. The average nba player only plays for only 4.71 years (according to a survey done in 2007). Losing one year of salary is losing more than 20% of their career salary, and for most of the players, the NBA salary is the main salary that they will have their entire life. The current CBA proposal gives a 12% reduction in current salaries as compared to last year (off topic, but also with the current CBA proposal, average nba salaries are expected to raise 60% in ten years as compared to the amount the average NBA player made last year). The median player in the league will not see 12% off their entire salary, however, because half of their career would have been over, making it a 6% hit on their salary, (including upcoming rookies in the discussion). The average NBA salary is $5.15 million a year multiplied by 4.71 years is $24.25 million dollars. The lockout will have the average NBA player lose $5.15 million dollars per year and the current CBA will have them lose $1.44 million dollars. The majority of NBA will not be able to find jobs overseas this year according to multiple reports and they will come back to a CBA proposal that is worse than the current one. While a few of the players are looking out for future generations, most of the public quotes are from players looking to maximize their own financial gains (nothing wrong with that, plus the 10 year projection is very favorable towards the players anyways), but I am just showing that the players can maximize their earnings potential through taking the contract. The average player will get no where near the current NBA salary if they go overseas the next year or if they start their own league. Side note, if you are going to talk to a person asking them to go to business school when they have already, it helps your case not to talk in all caps at times.

    *(to a certain extent since there are substitutions available for the non-star players and because franchise history is a large part of the product in the currently profitable teams)

  • neokoros

    @shanesfm

    shanesfm. Please see reply further below. Also, personal attacks make me doubt you ever went to college and are not necessary. Players are employees AND the product,*

    that is very simple and obvious.

    But overall, I don’t understand what any of this has to do with my initial comment saying that if players cancel the year, it hurts them more financially then taking the deal. The average nba player only plays for only 4.71 years (according to a survey done in 2007). Losing one year of salary is losing more than 20% of their career salary, and for most of the players, the NBA salary is the main salary that they will have their entire life. The current CBA proposal gives a 12% reduction in current salaries as compared to last year (off topic, but also with the current CBA proposal, average nba salaries are expected to raise 60% in ten years as compared to the amount the average NBA player made last year). The median player in the league will not see 12% off their entire salary, however, because half of their career would have been over, making it a 6% hit on their salary, (including upcoming rookies in the discussion). The average NBA salary is $5.15 million a year multiplied by 4.71 years is $24.25 million dollars. The lockout will have the average NBA player lose $5.15 million dollars per year and the current CBA will have them lose $1.44 million dollars over the course of their career. The majority of NBA will not be able to find jobs overseas this year according to multiple reports and they will come back to a CBA proposal that is worse than the current one. While a few of the players are looking out for future generations, most of the public quotes are from players looking to maximize their own financial gains (nothing wrong with that, plus the 10 year projection is very favorable towards the players anyways), but I am just showing that the players can maximize their earnings potential through taking the contract. The average player will get no where near the current NBA salary if they go overseas the next year or if they start their own league. Side note, if you are going to talk to a person asking them to go to business school when they have already, it helps your case not to talk in all caps at times.

    *(to a certain extent since there are substitutions available for the non-star players and because franchise history is a large part of the product in the currently profitable teams)

  • neokoros

    @shanesfm I hear all the time that if players like Lebron and Kobe left, it would have an impact on the league, thus the players are what put butts in the seats and they deserve all they ask for the negotiations, but the thing is that 10% of the players are the ones that draw the crowds and most of the players could be interchangeable without too much reaction and without loss of revenue. To compare it to a singer is a bad analogy, and using personal attacks shows your immaturity. Yes, Kobe and Lebron can have contracts like a singer in the entertainment business, but this bri split is for all players and players like Wayne Ellington, Lazar Hayward, Malcolm Lee, Darko Milicic, Novi Sad, Brad Miller, Nikola Pekovic, Luke Ridnour, Sebastian Telfair, Anthony Tollive, and Martell Webster, are more like the little known opening act to a concert – they are not the draw themselves. That is the problem with the contract, not that the Kobe’s Lebron’s, Durants, and Rose’s are paid too much, but other players are. If you took business school classes like I have, you would know that you can’t apply facts from 10% of the group to the whole and you need to see things from a overall perspective. Also if you want to compare this to actors, the headliner actors get the millions while the minor characters and one-liners get very, very little in comparison. A movie studio would never agree to give a certain % of profits to the actor in the movie who has one minute of dialogue. Those people are interchangeable and you can’t say that actor got people to the theaters and HE is the product, the main revenue draw is the headliner actors and the way that the whole film was put together.

  • neokoros

    @shanesfm Please see reply further below. Also, personal attacks make me doubt you ever went to college and are not necessary. Players are employees AND the product,*

    that is very simple and obvious.

    But overall, I don’t understand what any of this has to do with my initial comment saying that if players cancel the year, it hurts them more financially then taking the deal. The average nba player only plays for only 4.71 years (according to a survey done in 2007). Losing one year of salary is losing more than 20% of their career salary, and for most of the players, the NBA salary is the main salary that they will have their entire life. The current CBA proposal gives a 12% reduction in current salaries as compared to last year (off topic, but also with the current CBA proposal, average nba salaries are expected to raise 60% in ten years as compared to the amount the average NBA player made last year). The median player in the league will not see 12% off their entire salary, however, because half of their career would have been over, making it a 6% hit on their salary, (including upcoming rookies in the discussion). The average NBA salary is $5.15 million a year multiplied by 4.71 years is $24.25 million dollars. The lockout will have the average NBA player lose $5.15 million dollars per year and the current CBA will have them lose $1.44 million dollars. The majority of NBA will not be able to find jobs overseas this year according to multiple reports and they will come back to a CBA proposal that is worse than the current one. While a few of the players are looking out for future generations, most of the public quotes are from players looking to maximize their own financial gains (nothing wrong with that, plus the 10 year projection is very favorable towards the players anyways), but I am just showing that the players can maximize their earnings potential through taking the contract. The average player will get no where near the current NBA salary if they go overseas the next year or if they start their own league. Side note, if you are going to talk to a person asking them to go to business school when they have already, it helps your case not to talk in all caps at times.

    *(to a certain extent since there are substitutions available for the non-star players and because franchise history is a large part of the product in the currently profitable teams)

  • neokoros

    @shanesfm

    shanesfm. Please see reply further below. Also, personal attacks make me doubt you ever went to college and are not necessary. Players are employees AND the product,*

    that is very simple and obvious.

    But overall, I don’t understand what any of this has to do with my initial comment saying that if players cancel the year, it hurts them more financially then taking the deal. The average nba player only plays for only 4.71 years (according to a survey done in 2007). Losing one year of salary is losing more than 20% of their career salary, and for most of the players, the NBA salary is the main salary that they will have their entire life. The current CBA proposal gives a 12% reduction in current salaries as compared to last year (off topic, but also with the current CBA proposal, average nba salaries are expected to raise 60% in ten years as compared to the amount the average NBA player made last year). The median player in the league will not see 12% off their entire salary, however, because half of their career would have been over, making it a 6% hit on their salary, (including upcoming rookies in the discussion). The average NBA salary is $5.15 million a year multiplied by 4.71 years is $24.25 million dollars. The lockout will have the average NBA player lose $5.15 million dollars per year and the current CBA will have them lose $1.44 million dollars over the course of their career. The majority of NBA will not be able to find jobs overseas this year according to multiple reports and they will come back to a CBA proposal that is worse than the current one. While a few of the players are looking out for future generations, most of the public quotes are from players looking to maximize their own financial gains (nothing wrong with that, plus the 10 year projection is very favorable towards the players anyways), but I am just showing that the players can maximize their earnings potential through taking the contract. The average player will get no where near the current NBA salary if they go overseas the next year or if they start their own league. Side note, if you are going to talk to a person asking them to go to business school when they have already, it helps your case not to talk in all caps at times.

    *(to a certain extent since there are substitutions available for the non-star players and because franchise history is a large part of the product in the currently profitable teams)

  • VictoriaNicole23

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  • VictoriaNicole23

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  • shanesfm

    @neokoros I love how you copy and pasted the bulk of your reply to me. It shows me you lack any intelligent insight into any sort of rebuttal of any kind. Did I go to college? Ha-ha. Isn’t that conclusive in how I’m “handling” you. And my “integrity” (which I’m assuming is what your referring to) does not measure my degrees that I have earned. Point is I can be an a$$hole and still be far superior in my knowledge in certain areas. So, all I can say is sorry for coming off aggressive, but I’m not sorry for you getting all frazzled because of it. That’s your issue, not mine.

    As for the deal, well as you and everyone knows NOW…it’s past that and the fans are on the path of losing what could have been an epic year.

    The contract proposal, if you ever read it, limits the players. Of course, if you read the contract you still wouldn’t understand it unless you had some sense of contracts and the nature of the business on the other end. I’m not saying I do, but I’m fortunate to have a friend that is and I’m fortunate to have acquired that insight from this personal friend. Trust me, it’s far to complicated to type on here and I’m not a typist like you that can type (copy and paste) things on the internet.

    However, I would like to point out that in these negotiations the players have come to these table meetings giving up a lot. In fact, they are the only one that has been negotiating while the other side is staying firm NOT negotiating..?? On top of that these owners are yelling that they are losing money, but at the same time will not open up the books…?? It’s the same old power house business hardball shhh…I’m all to familiar with. Do you think these owners give a crap? Even the ones who own smaller teams? They don’t! They are Millionaires and in some case billionaires! Owning a team is a sidekick. A way to boast about something at there yacht clubs while sipping on a martini. So, in that spirit it’s really about pride at this point. ON BOTH SIDES! And the fans will get hit for it! THANKS NBA…IT’S BEEN A REAL SLICE!

  • shanesfm

    @neokoros If you read comment (which you couldn’t have-trust me-that’s a compliment-read on) than you would know that I said Entertainment business. Not actors or singers, but ENTERTAINMENT! And if you didn’t know this was an entertainment business then your out of your league buddy. And you will reply by correcting me and saying it’s a sport and blah blah! Yes! It is a sport. It’s a sport that was made to entertain people. Advertising, Tickets and big Event showings either in arenas or TV is called ENTERTAINMENT! That’s all it is. It being a sport only sorts itself into a category of entertainment…but it’s entertainment nonetheless and it’s structured as Entertainment business.

    So, I’m sure you just mis-read my comment because I would like to hope I’m debating someone to at least that standard or I might as well being yelling at the wall here. ha-ha. (sorry…poor humor)

    In any event, I believe this whole season will be lost over Rich guys jealousy of other rich guys in their circle and the players from having too much pride. Those are unfortunately the nastiest of combinations in any contract meeting. Unless a real mediator that commands respect from both sides can step in and calm everyone down and work it out…this season is lost! Which is heartbreaking because I’m an avid Basketball fan! Yes, College basketball is on, but it’s not the same…because that is a sport business…not my NBA.

  • shanesfm

    @neokoros And to get ahead of the bullet reply from you about my “copy and paste” comment…I am referring to damn near every other line is a percentage from an article, poll or survey. The point of replying is to not reply back with stuff that we BOTH have already been reading. It reeks lack of any personal intuition on your part. I can copy and paste Facts and Statistics and I can swing it to my benefit, but it leaves me (the reader) unimpressed because It wasn’t from you…it was from 10 different articles you read all those Facts/Polls and surveys from.

    How about you be creative…that’s all I was saying.

  • shanesfm

    @neokoros I love how you copy and pasted the bulk of your reply to me. It shows me you lack any intelligent insight into any sort of rebuttal of any kind. Did I go to college? Ha-ha. Isn’t that conclusive in how I’m “handling” you. And my “integrity” (which I’m assuming is what your referring to) does not measure my degrees that I have earned. Point is I can be an a$$hole and still be far superior in my knowledge in certain areas. So, all I can say is sorry for coming off aggressive, but I’m not sorry for you getting all frazzled because of it. That’s your issue, not mine.

    As for the deal, well as you and everyone knows NOW…it’s past that and the fans are on the path of losing what could have been an epic year.

    The contract proposal, if you ever read it, limits the players. Of course, if you read the contract you still wouldn’t understand it unless you had some sense of contracts and the nature of the business on the other end. I’m not saying I do, but I’m fortunate to have a friend that is and I’m fortunate to have acquired that insight from this personal friend. Trust me, it’s far to complicated to type on here and I’m not a typist like you that can type (copy and paste) things on the internet.

    However, I would like to point out that in these negotiations the players have come to these table meetings giving up a lot. In fact, they are the only one that has been negotiating while the other side is staying firm NOT negotiating..?? On top of that these owners are yelling that they are losing money, but at the same time will not open up the books…?? It’s the same old power house business hardball shhh…I’m all to familiar with. Do you think these owners give a crap? Even the ones who own smaller teams? They don’t! They are Millionaires and in some case billionaires! Owning a team is a sidekick. A way to boast about something at there yacht clubs while sipping on a martini. So, in that spirit it’s really about pride at this point. ON BOTH SIDES! And the fans will get hit for it! THANKS NBA…IT’S BEEN A REAL SLICE!

  • shanesfm

    @neokoros If you read comment (which you couldn’t have-trust me-that’s a compliment-read on) than you would know that I said Entertainment business. Not actors or singers, but ENTERTAINMENT! And if you didn’t know this was an entertainment business then your out of your league buddy. And you will reply by correcting me and saying it’s a sport and blah blah! Yes! It is a sport. It’s a sport that was made to entertain people. Advertising, Tickets and big Event showings either in arenas or TV is called ENTERTAINMENT! That’s all it is. It being a sport only sorts itself into a category of entertainment…but it’s entertainment nonetheless and it’s structured as Entertainment business.

    So, I’m sure you just mis-read my comment because I would like to hope I’m debating someone to at least that standard or I might as well being yelling at the wall here. ha-ha. (sorry…poor humor)

    In any event, I believe this whole season will be lost over Rich guys jealousy of other rich guys in their circle and the players from having too much pride. Those are unfortunately the nastiest of combinations in any contract meeting. Unless a real mediator that commands respect from both sides can step in and calm everyone down and work it out…this season is lost! Which is heartbreaking because I’m an avid Basketball fan! Yes, College basketball is on, but it’s not the same…because that is a sport business…not my NBA.

  • shanesfm

    @neokoros And to get ahead of the bullet reply from you about my “copy and paste” comment…I am referring to damn near every other line is a percentage from an article, poll or survey. The point of replying is to not reply back with stuff that we BOTH have already been reading. It reeks lack of any personal intuition on your part. I can copy and paste Facts and Statistics and I can swing it to my benefit, but it leaves me (the reader) unimpressed because It wasn’t from you…it was from 10 different articles you read all those Facts/Polls and surveys from.

    How about you be creative…that’s all I was saying.

  • neokoros

    @shanesfm Wow, I wonder how old you are. Not one single line from my reply was copy and pasted. The math was done 100% from me and I backed up my math with correct figures with research. I guess it would suit you better if I used incorrect or rounded off simple figures to do the math with for you? I run the business numbers for living buddy, and if you can find one single sentence of mine copy and pasted from another article, please show me.And I never said the owners are saints or that they correct, or that I support that strong arm tactics. I am just saying that the players would have befitted financially from taking the last deal over the current route that they are taking. And since you say that you read plenty of articles, you should notice that 90% or so of them (a vague rough estimate , the vast majority of them anyways) supports this view.

  • neokoros

    @shanesfm Yes the season is in all likelihood lost and that’s a shame. But I can’t understand your post in all honesty. You mention entertainment business, so its different. I show that just because its entertainment business doesn’t mean the employees/product gets a huge amount of leverage (i.e. backup singers, opening convert acts, minor movie characters, etc) since they are replaceable, and its the same way in basketball for the bottom third of the league. You rebut that basketball players are not like singers or actors, because they are in “ENTERTAINMENT.” Are you thus saying that the backup singers, opening convert acts, minor movie characters, etc are not in entertainment?The players who are superstars and big draws have leverage and add $$$ to the league and will hurt the league if they leave. But if the league loses Wayne Ellington or Lazar Hayward or Malcolm Lee or Darko Milicic or Anthony Tolliver or Derrick Williams, no one will bat an eye and the league will not lose much money at all and they can be replaced by players in Europe or the D-league. More money in the CBA goes to non-superstars than superstars.

    Lady Gaga or Katy Perry or Tom Cruise or Kobe Bryant can leave their studio or their movie contract or their league and leave to another one that will pay handsomely because they are a draw that will bring money to who ever is investing in them. People like Tolliver or Hayward has no where else to go and thats why they can get screwed by the NBA. I am not saying its right, but its life.

  • neokoros

    @shanesfm Again, in case you have trouble, I said the players would benefit *financially* if they took the last deal, and the reason that they rejected it is reportedly not even finances, its system issues and flexibility to change teams, which is a different issue all together I am not going to touch on now. I love how when I do the math and show how it is financially beneficial to take the deal, you resort to saying its copy and pasted. I wonder if you say that whenever you don’t know what else to say. Again, not one word was “copied and pasted” but numbers were indeed from research I did about a week before replying to you, and it makes you feel better, the numbers were recited from my memory. In case how I can remember so many numbers, I just looked up and checked on my reply, the only numbers I used to base my math off of were 4.71 years and 5.15 million dollars in that long reply. Everything else was simple math on my part. How that long reply is just copying and pasting facts and figures to you when its just 2 numbers researched is beyond me.

  • neokoros

    @shanesfm Wow, I wonder how old you are. Not one single line from my reply was copy and pasted. The math was done 100% from me and I backed up my math with correct figures with research. I guess it would suit you better if I used incorrect or rounded off simple figures to do the math with for you? I run the business numbers for living buddy, and if you can find one single sentence of mine copy and pasted from another article, please show me.And I never said the owners are saints or that they correct, or that I support that strong arm tactics. I am just saying that the players would have befitted financially from taking the last deal over the current route that they are taking. And since you say that you read plenty of articles, you should notice that 90% or so of them (a vague rough estimate , the vast majority of them anyways) supports this view.

  • neokoros

    @shanesfm Yes the season is in all likelihood lost and that’s a shame. But I can’t understand your post in all honesty. You mention entertainment business, so its different. I show that just because its entertainment business doesn’t mean the employees/product gets a huge amount of leverage (i.e. backup singers, opening convert acts, minor movie characters, etc) since they are replaceable, and its the same way in basketball for the bottom third of the league. You rebut that basketball players are not like singers or actors, because they are in “ENTERTAINMENT.” Are you thus saying that the backup singers, opening convert acts, minor movie characters, etc are not in entertainment?The players who are superstars and big draws have leverage and add $$$ to the league and will hurt the league if they leave. But if the league loses Wayne Ellington or Lazar Hayward or Malcolm Lee or Darko Milicic or Anthony Tolliver or Derrick Williams, no one will bat an eye and the league will not lose much money at all and they can be replaced by players in Europe or the D-league. More money in the CBA goes to non-superstars than superstars.

    Lady Gaga or Katy Perry or Tom Cruise or Kobe Bryant can leave their studio or their movie contract or their league and leave to another one that will pay handsomely because they are a draw that will bring money to who ever is investing in them. People like Tolliver or Hayward has no where else to go and thats why they can get screwed by the NBA. I am not saying its right, but its life.

  • neokoros

    @shanesfm Again, in case you have trouble, I said the players would benefit *financially* if they took the last deal, and the reason that they rejected it is reportedly not even finances, its system issues and flexibility to change teams, which is a different issue all together I am not going to touch on now. I love how when I do the math and show how it is financially beneficial to take the deal, you resort to saying its copy and pasted. I wonder if you say that whenever you don’t know what else to say. Again, not one word was “copied and pasted” but numbers were indeed from research I did about a week before replying to you, and it makes you feel better, the numbers were recited from my memory. In case how I can remember so many numbers, I just looked up and checked on my reply, the only numbers I used to base my math off of were 4.71 years and 5.15 million dollars in that long reply. Everything else was simple math on my part. How that long reply is just copying and pasting facts and figures to you when its just 2 numbers researched is beyond me.

  • http://www.veloxtelco.com.au/ Stephanie Barnes

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  • http://www.veloxtelco.com.au/ Stephanie Barnes

    Hi there..Great,you’ve done it well in written details.I;m looking forward to hear more from you.Thank you for sharing your article with us.

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