The 2014 Draft Combine Numbers Breakdown (Guards)

Use your ← → (arrows) to browse

The projected lottery players did well at the NBA Draft Combine.  Some players may have gone up in the draft, some may have dropped.  Still, there are some things to take away when it comes to the results of the combine. Dante Exum, Noah Vonleh, Aaron Gordon, Marcus Smart, Rodney Hood, and Julius Randle all did well.

First, let’s just state that combine numbers do not mean elite NBA level caliber athletes.  Why?  Guys can measure well with individual exercises, but not use those same tools on the basketball floor. How is this possible? Let’s use Dwyane Wade as an example.

Apr 26, 2014; Charlotte, NC, USA; Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade (3) goes up for a shot over Charlotte Bobcats center Al Jefferson (25) during the first half in game three of the first round of the 2014 NBA Playoffs at Time Warner Cable Arena. Mandatory Credit: Jeremy Brevard-USA TODAY Sports

Apr 26, 2014; Charlotte, NC, USA; Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade (3) goes up for a shot over Charlotte Bobcats center Al Jefferson (25) during the first half in game three of the first round of the 2014 NBA Playoffs at Time Warner Cable Arena. Mandatory Credit: Jeremy Brevard-USA TODAY Sports

Dwyane “Flash” Wade is known for flying down in transition, using his wingspan and vertical ability to finish at the rim with authority.  Defenses are at their heels when he has speed going for him.

How did he measure at the combine?

His full athletic measurements can be found at this 2003 NBA Draft Combine link.

Let’s keep in mind, that he has a 6’10.75″ wingspan, 8’6″ standing reach, and a max vertical result of 34.5″.  While the wingspan is elite by position, comparable to great size small forwards, the maximum vertical result is average at best.

Yet, he flies down the floor and is one of the best finishers in the league, is he not?

 

Apr 13, 2014; Los Angeles, CA, USA; Los Angeles Lakers forward Nick Young (0) puts up a reverse layup past Memphis Grizzlies center Marc Gasol (33) during second half action at Staples Center. Mandatory Credit: Robert Hanashiro-USA TODAY Sports

 

Now, let’s contrast to Nick “Swaggy P” Young.

How did he measure at the combine?

Nick Young’s full combine measurements from his 2007 NBA Pre-Draft Camp can be found here.

Nick Young is not only taller than Dwyane Wade, but he also has a longer wingspan. Yet, his standing reach is actually 1.5″ lower.  Still, he has a max vert of 40.5″ and a no-step vert of 39.5″.  That should scream that he’s an elite NBA athlete and one of the best finishers in the NBA.  The truth?  His game is primarly set up for creating shots from the perimeter.  He’s reluctant to drive to the basket.  When he does finish with a dunk, he finishes strong, but not with the height and power of Dwyane Wade.

Strong combine results do not always guarantee similar results on an NBA floor.

Use your ← → (arrows) to browse

comments powered by Disqus